International Journal of Hematology and Oncology 2019, Vol 29, Num 1 Page(s): 038-045
Progesterone Receptor Status May be the Most Important Prognostic Factor for Meningiomas

Abdurrahman CETIN1, Sahin LACIN2, Nilgun SOGUTCU3

1University of Health Sciences, Diyarbakır Gazi Yasargil Training and Research Hospital, Department of Nuorosurgery, Diyarbakır, TURKEY
2University of Health Sciences, Diyarbakır Gazi Yasargil Training and Research Hospital, Department of Medical Oncololgy, Diyarbakır, TURKEY
3University of Health Sciences, Diyarbakır Gazi Yasargil Training and Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, Diyarbakır, TURKEY

Keywords: Meningioma, Estrogen receptor, Progesterone receptor, Grade, Neoplasm
The aim of this study examined the relationships between progesterone receptor (PR) and estrogen receptor (ER) status in meningiomas and tumor grade, proliferative index (Ki67), and prognosis. Immunohistochemistry with monoclonal rabbit antibodies was performed on 4 mm paraffin sections of all tumors that were confirmed as meningiomas. Samples were assessed for tumor grade, PR and ER expression, and Ki67 status. Correlations among these parameters and their prognostic values were investigated. Overall survival (OS) was 91.4 months, and there was a significant difference in OS between genders. OS for females and males was 100.2 and 45.7 months, respectively (p= 0.02). When patients were divided into two groups by age, there was a significant difference in OS between those aged 50 years and younger and those older than 50 years, 113.2 and 65.1 months, respectively (p= 0.001). There was also a significant difference in OS based on PR status. OS among PR-negative patients was 43.8 months, whereas it was 93.7 months in weakly positive patients, and 95.2 months in strongly positive patients (p= 0.035). Overall, 10 (13.5%) patients had ER expression detectable by the monoclonal antibody technique used. All ER-positive tumor samples were from female patients; all tumors from males were negative for ER staining. Female predominance of meningiomas as the most common primary intracranial neoplasm strongly suggests that sex hormones may affect meningioma growth. This study found that PR status was a prognostic factor in our meningioma series, as were gender and age.